Member of the Advisory Board

Priya Prakash

Priya Prakash

Founder, D4SC (Design For Social Change)

D4SC creates collaborative systems that bring people and machines together to co-create smarter cities with their data, activity and intelligence. D4SC’s award winning urban products Changify and CitizenCanvas has been featured in Wired, Ted City 2.0, BBC, and have been exhibited at the Smart City World Expo. D4SC contributes and co-authors industry standards for smart cities at the BSI and Cities Standards Institute.
Prakash enjoys creating new habits and behaviours with 14 years’ product and design leadership experience, bringing together product teams from startups to corporates. She speaks at SXSW, O’Reilly ETech, IXDA and is a visiting tutor at UCL, RCA, LSE and Syracuse University.

Listed on 2014 TechCity Insider 100 for innovating smarter cities, Prakash is a RSA fellow with a MA in Computer Related Design from the Royal College of Art and holds patents for BBC iPlayer and Nokia Asha phones.

Júlia Keserű

Júlia Keserű

Julia Keseru leads the Matchbox Program of the Engine Room, supporting partners to bring about positive change, and building a network of experts and social change instigators. Prior to joining The Engine Room, Julia led the international work of the Sunlight Foundation. Coming from the Hungarian transparency community, she has been an advocate for open government and open data issues with a special focus on political finance and corruption. Julia has spoken internationally on technology and transparency and regularly writes about the challenges and the potential of the global open government movement.

Ivar Tallo

Ivar Tallo

Ivar Tallo is the founding director of e-Governance Academy of Estonia. He has been a Member of Parliament of Estonia and Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe. He has also worked as a Foreign Policy Advisor to the President of Estonia. He has been lecturing on public policy and public administration at Tartu University. Recently he returned to Estonia after finishing his contract as the manager for e-governance programme at UNITAR (United Nations Institute for Training and Research) in Geneva.

He was the author of the Basic Principles of Information Policy of Estonia, Code of Conduct for Civil Servants and co-authored Public Information Act. At Council of Europe, he was the raporteur for the Cybercrime Convention.

He was trained in logic at Leningrad University (1982-1990) and in political science at McGill University (1991-1995). He has been fellow at the Institute for European History in Mainz, Germany (1989, 1992) and at the Institute for Advanced Studies, Budapest (1995-1996).

Ivar has trained and advised e-governance leaders in more than 50 countries. His last engagements have been as a team leader for the EU “e-Armenia” project and change management team leader in electronic business registry project in Oman and team leader in G2C project in Bhutan. From September, he will be RTA for e-gov twinning in Tbilisi, Georgia.

Gustavo Piga

Gustavo Piga

Gustavo Piga, Ph. D. in Economics at Columbia University, is Full Professor of Economics and Vice Rector for International Affairs at the University of Rome Tor Vergata.

He chaired the Italian Procurement Agency for Goods and Services, Consip Ltd., between 2002 and 2005.

A macroeconomist and a blogger, besides several scientific papers he is the author of the renowned "Derivatives in Public Debt Management" and co-editor of a number of books, among which of the "Handbook of Procurement", Cambridge University Press, with Nicola Dimitri and Giancarlo Spagnolo and "Revisiting Keynes", MIT Press, with Lorenzo Pecchi.

His research interests are in macroeconomics, anticorruption and public procurement.

Francesca Recanatini

Francesca Recanatini

Francesca Recanatini has worked on governance, institution building and corruption since the beginning of her career working at the Center of Institutional Reforms and Informal Sector (IRIS) in College Park. Throughout her career she has focused on integrating issues of governance and integrity in institutional development and growth. Ms. Recanatini joined the World Bank in 1998 and has supported the design and implementation of governance and capacity building initiatives in Africa, Latin America, and the countries of the Former Soviet Union. She currently works in the Middle Eastern Region and selected European countries, providing guidance on governance issues and strengthening integrity institutions. She manages the Actionable Governance Indicators work and the Anti-Corruption Authorities Initiative to promote capacity and effectiveness around the world. She also coordinates the work on governance and anti-corruption diagnostic tools in several countries in Latin America and Africa, having completed more than half dozen reports that have translated in country-specific strategies. Recently she has begun focusing on the design and the implementation of anti-corruption programs focused on learning and prevention through the strengthening of public sector agencies in high income countries (ex. Italy, Greece, Kuwait).

She has published several papers on corruption and poor governance, contributing recently to the Global Handbook on Research and Practice in Corruption, Adam Graycar, editor (January 2012); and to the International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, Susan Rose-Akerman and Tina Soreide, eds. (December 2011). She is currently a Member of the EU Group of Experts on Corruption and holds a Ph.D in Economics from the University of Maryland at College Park.

Goran Klemenčič

Goran Klemenčič

Goran Klemenčič completed a master’s degree at Harvard Law School after graduating from both Faculty of Law and Faculty of Computer Science at University of Ljubljana. He continued with post-graduate studies at the National University of Ireland.

He worked as a consultant at The European Committee on Crime Problems of the Council of Europe in Strasbourg, and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in Paris. He also participated in the preparation of the legal bases of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague. For two years he was also a member of the OECD anti-corruption management committee.

In 2010, he became a Chief Commissioner of the Commission for the Prevention of Corruption of the Republic of Slovenia. In 2013, the Commission's 2012-2013 Investigation Report on the parliamentary parties' leaders revealed that Janez Janša, PM, and Zoran Janković, the head of the opposition, systematically and repeatedly violated the law by failing to properly report their assets. On February 18 2015, the Supreme Court of Slovenia ruled that all sections regarding Janez Janša must be removed from this report because the Commission for the Prevention of Corruption failed to send the draft of the report to Janša for submission of his comments, and thus seriously violated Janša's rights, granted by the article 22 of the Slovenian constitution. On May 29 2015, the Supreme Court of Slovenia additionally ruled that all sections regarding Zoran Janković must also be removed for exactly the same reason.